March has continued to be dry with less than 2 mm of rain, even so it was good to see the estuarine silver brim coming back in good numbers in the Anglesea Inlet.

breamEstuaring Silver Bream

One morning at sunrise a juvenile Sea Lion was found dozing at low tide on the back beach at Point Roadknight.

A large two metre plus Black Stingray was seen with a couple of the normal sized 1.2metre rays feeding in 30 cm of water on the whiting carcases left by the morning’s fishermen at the Point Roadknight boat ramp.

As always there have been some large moths coming into the mothing light. Below is the range of Swift/Ghost moths from the Hepialidae family that have been recorded at Niblick Street in March.

moths

Recently on the warmer afternoons with the rising swarms of small insects, large flocks of fork-tailed swifts have been seen circling through and having a feast.

The Southern Boobook owls have been visiting the Harvey Street woodlands and Golf course with their calls regularly being heard, and the pair of Wedge-tailed Eagles have been seen regularly soaring over the tip and hills behind Anglesea.

The birds have had to share their baths with the echidnas who have been frequenting the in-ground bird baths regularly over the recent hotter period.

echidna bathEchidna in bath

A very healthy adult Jacky Lizard was seen basking on a branch: there have been two colour forms noticed around Anglesea of late - a beige and a grey form.

jacky lizardJacky Lizard

A brightly banded Tiger Snake approximately one metre long was seen sliding down the scree slopes at Urquhart Bluff. It eventually made its way back into coastal heath via the beach.

tiger snake1tiger snake2Tiger Snake

John Lenagan

Events Calendar

Apr
27

Sat 6:00pm - 10:30pm

Apr
28

Sun 9:30am - 11:00am

Apr
29

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Apr
30

Tue 10:00am - 11:30am

May
14

Tue 9:30am - 11:00am

Weed of the month

Freesia

Freesia

Freesia refracta and Freesia alba X F. leichtlinii are declared weeds in the Surf Coast Shire because they spread easily and threaten to invade bushland. Freesias are perennial herbs that die back in summer and produce new foliage in winter. The highly fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers appearing in spring are white to cream and pink with yellow markings, shaded purple on outer surface. Each plant has at least two corms, one below the other, thus requiring deep digging to remove them.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

Sign up for membership

ANGAIR membership gives you access to a range of great activities and benefits. Learn more about all these benefits as well as how to sign up and renew.

Sign Up

Get to know your local Friends groups

There are a number of wonderful local Friends Groups that provide ANGAIR members and the community with opportunities for involvement.

Find a local group

Go to top